A space for students to exhibit their artistic endeavors, both academic and co-curricular

Currently on Display

Scanning of charcoal drawings by Iris Yuting Zeng. Courtesy of the artist.

Moving into the Being Mind: Finding the Grip

Work by Iris Yuting Zeng, M.Arch ’24

No experience or training is required to start drawing. Simply doing the most easy and innate action creates an unexpected transcendental journey for us to move out of the thinking mind and into the being mind. This collection of charcoal and watercolor drawings marks the start of a process that was later recognized as a tool for the materialization of the inner world. The repetition of circular movement drops the burden of cognitive processing, therefore creating a void space between the conscious mind and the awareness. Visitors are invited to experiment with drawing materials provided in the gallery at any time or can sign up to attend a drawing session guided by the artist.


Drawing Sessions with Iris Yuting Zeng
30 minute sessions are available on Wednesdays from 4:30-5:30pm on January 31, February 7, and 14, 2024 or between 5:30-6:30pm on Thursdays, February 1, 8, and 15, 2024. Enjoy the freedom to draw like a kid with no constraints or judgment. No previous experience is needed.

Closing Reception:
Thursday, February 22, 2024 / 5:30-7:00pm
No registration necessary

On Display:
January 27 – February 25, 2024
Wiesner Student Art Gallery, open 9:00am–6:00pm daily

Upcoming Exhibition

Evan Kramer, MIT Dome with star trails and air traffic in full spectrum, 2021. Ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light is captured in this “full spectrum” image resulting in the unique color balance including the pink-tinted tree leaves. Composite image with 1,600 frames for the night sky and five frames for the foreground from the roof of the McNair Building. Courtesy of the artist.

Celestial City

Work by Evan L. Kramer, PhD Candidate, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics ’25

Celestial City is an exploration of the familiar from a new perspective. Few think of photographing astronomical objects in urban, light polluted environments. However, from the vantage point of MIT campus rooftops above street-level light pollution and with specialized photography equipment, the night skies of Cambridge and Boston can be captured in all their glory. The stars, moon, planets, International Space Station, eclipses, meteors, and nebulae are captured in their choreographed celestial dance over the hustle and bustle of city life. Although central to the photographic process, the night sky is not the only focus of the imagery on display. Known worldwide as the hub of innovation, MIT’s iconic structures and people are featured prominently, from the Dome and Green Building to the graduate students in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department, as fitting foregrounds to this first-of-its-kind exhibit of urban astrophotography.

Exhibition on Display:
March 1 – 31, 2024
Wiesner Student Art Gallery, open 9:00am–6:00pm daily

Opening Reception:
Friday, March 1, 2024 / 5:00-7:00pm
Wiesner Student Art Gallery
Stratton Student Center, W20 Room 209
84 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Additional Event:
Gazing Upwards
Saturday, March 2, 2024 / 2:00pm
MIT Museum
314 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142

An afternoon with National Geographic night sky photographer Babak Tafreshi and MIT urban astrophotographer Evan Kramer.
Free with Museum admission. Pre-registration not required or available. Seating is limited so early arrival is suggested.

Previous Exhibitions + Happenings

shore/lime/line/light

Work by Aubrie R.M. James, SMACT ‘24


The environment of MIT is not porous; the hard-surfaced landscape conspires to convince us that we are somehow in a place without memory. Using techniques of counter-mapping, projection, ecological and archival research, and material exploration of the land, this show attempts to create and illuminate small fissures in the psychogeographic landscape of MIT.

On Display:
December 1, 2023 through January 14, 2024 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery, open 9:00am–6:00pm daily.

Reception:
December 1, 2023 / 5:00–7:00pm

Additional Event: Shoreline déRive
December 6, 2023 / 1:00pm
Meet outside Dewey Library, MIT Building E53
30 Wadsworth Street, Cambridge, MA

Join the artist for a guided group walk that traces the pre-landmaking river shoreline through the MIT campus.

Come Back And Tell Me Why Things Last

Work by Lauren Gideonse (M.Arch ‘24) and Adriana Giorgis (M.Arch ‘24)


Come Back and Tell Me Why Things Last shares a set of parables, case study buildings, and their stories, towards understanding the factors that affect building lifespan in the United States. The exhibition is the product of two long road trips through the American landscape with the route shaped to collect particularly old and materially significant buildings. At each site, documentation was performed, ephemera was collected, and steward interviews were conducted.

This work has been reinforced by the artists’ ongoing partnership with Boston Building Resources (BBR), a local building material reuse non-profit. All stock components from the show will be donated to BBR after closing in a gesture of support for their important work in maintaining the affordability of materials for housing upkeep and preservation in Roxbury.

On Display:
September 22 through November 9, 2023 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery, open 9:00am–6:00pm daily.

Reception:
October 13, 2023 / 5:00–7:00pm

2023 Schnitzer Prize in the Visual Arts

An exhibition of work by Felix Li (’23, Art and Design), Manar Moursi (PhD Candidate, History, Theory and Criticism of Architecture and Art), Reina Mun (G, Art, Culture, and Technology Program), and Karyn Nakamura (’23, Art and Design).

What happens when technologies fulfill their mission? What happens when they fail, or decay, or when the need for which they were created no longer exists? These are the questions asked by the four student winners of the 2023 Harold and Arlene Schnitzer Prize in the Visual Arts at MIT. Working across a broad spectrum of media, these four artists explore our intimate relationships with time, with memory and tradition, and with the fleeting nature of meaning. The stories they tell begin where most stories end, in a magical rearview mirror that somehow tells us more about where we are heading than where we have been.

The Harold and Arlene Schnitzer Prize is presented to current MIT students for excellence in a body of work. Students submit an artistic portfolio for consideration. “Working with a wide range of media, from photography and video to artist books and printed matter, as well as devising technologically sophisticated installations and interactive objects, these remarkable students demonstrate the diversity and excellence of creative work taking place at the Institute,” says Andrea Volpe, Director of the Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT). “All four Schnitzer prize winners reflect on their relationships to memory, time, place, and technology. The council is particularly proud to have previously supported the work of these artists through its grant programs.”

On Display:
Online exhibition, on going

The Deep Time Project: Architecture as Planetary Abstraction

An exhibition of work by students of The Deep Time Project taught by Cristina Parreño Alonso: Lara Andra Avram, Simina Marin, Christina Dimitri Battikha, Ekin Bilal, Juan Manuel Chavez, Pa Ramyarupa, Tatiana Victorovna Estrina, and Andrea Sandell.

Exhibition team: Andrea Sandell, Sahil Dharam Mohan, and Christina Battikha.

An exhibition of work by the students of The Deep Time Project, a cross-disciplinary course taught by Cristina Parreño Alonso and supported by MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST) which was offered in fall 2022 at MIT Architecture. The course was set as an interdisciplinary conversation aiming to expand architectural timescales of perception. In doing so, it situated architecture in a world of entanglements between geological, technological, human, animal, and viral bodies co-producing the environment.

Inspired by a series of weekly readings and conversations with guests—geologists, journalists, anthropologists, historians, and architects—around the notion of deep time, each student explored a different constellation of temporalities and agencies in architecture through “material essays.” Material essays are tools for thought; vehicles for analytic, interpretative, critical views of architecture that transcend the medium of the text. In this exhibition they are a combination of text, moving image, sound, and physical prototypes.

On Display:
January 20 – March 24, 2023 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery, open 9:00am–6:00pm daily.

Reception:
February 17, 2022 / 5:00–7:00pm

Supported with a grant from the MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST) and the d’Arbeloff Fund for Excellence in Education.
Co-presented by CAST and the MIT Architecture Department.

STRAP: STRetch Assembly Performance

An exhibition of work by Technology Overload (M Arch ’23) and Harris Chowdhary (M Arch ’25)

In STRAP, artists Technology Overload (M Arch ’23) and Harris Chowdhary (M Arch ’25) present new works from their distinct explorations of politics, figuration, and control in digital spaces and contemporary cities. Through installation, drawing, text, and documentary practice, the exhibition materializes a conversation between the artists.

Technology Overload uses sculpture and image to explore flesh algorithmically stretched and deformed towards abstraction. Harris Chowdhary takes materials suspended from local waste streams and economies and re-assembles them into installation and text pieces. Both artists reimagine techniques they have learned during their time at MIT. Together, STRetch Assembly Performance asks how we are to respond to the crumbling systems we’ve created, and how they have in turn created us.

On Display:
November 18 – December 23, 2022 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery, open 9:00am–9:00pm daily

Reception:
Friday, November 18, 2022 / 5:00–7:00pm

Reconfiguración

An exhibition of work by Alejandro Medina, Graduate Student in the Art, Culture, and Technology Program at MIT

In Reconfiguración, Alejandro Medina presents five new works produced during his first year as a graduate student at MIT’s program in Art, Culture & Technology. The works were created out of the specific context of being at MIT and are conceived using materials derived from the university’s setting—the scientific research paper becomes the form for a new series of drawings, branches collected throughout the university’s campus are re-engaged with gravity in new structural configurations, and cardboard/paper waste from the Media Lab’s facilities are brought back to life as a 20 foot mural. The work centers around the artist’s preoccupation with climate change, particularly the urgent need to rethink relationships between nature, technology and science in order to build resilience against the challenges of the future.

On Display:
September 9–October 7, 2022 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery, open 9:00am–9:00pm daily

Reception:
September 16, 2022 / 5:00–7:00pm

TAKWIN

An exhibition of work by Ardalan SadeghiKivi, an Iranian artist, writer, and programmer pursuing a Master of Architecture at MIT

In TAKWIN, Ardalan SadeghiKivi summons, captures, and materializes phantom presences in the form of objects and bodies. Ghostly inhabitants of the digital realm impress themselves onto artifacts via the computational interface SadeghiKivi has created, thereby fantasizing about digital flesh and the disposition of natural, artificial, and in-betweens. The programs provoke a more profound and embodied understanding of the invisible processes within meta-media systems and meta-machines.

The exhibition dwells on the spine between the material and immaterial, revealing that they are not separate and opposite, but instead are alternative revelations of the same reality.

On Display:
July 6–August 12, 2022 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery, open 9:00am–9:00pm daily

2022 Schnitzer Prize in the Visual Arts Recipients Exhibition

An exhibition of work by Christopher Joshua Benton (Graduate Student in the Program in Art, Culture and Technology at MIT), Kwan Q Li (Graduate Student in the Program in Art, Culture and Technology at MIT, and Irmandy Wicaksono (PhD Candidate in Media Arts and Sciences).

Each year, the Harold and Arlene Schnitzer Prize recognizes excellent student work in the visual arts at MIT. Working across geographies, disciplines, and materials, the artistic practices of the three recipients of the 2022 prize demonstrate the diversity of creative work taking place at the Institute at the highest levels.

On Display:
May 19–June 12, 2022 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery, open 9:00am–9:00pm daily

Reception:
Thursday, May 26, 2022 / 5:30-7:00pm

Lodgers: Friction Between Neighbors

An exhibition of work by Zhicheng Xu (M.Arch ‘22), Mengqi Moon He (SMArchS ‘20), Calvin Zhong (B.S. ‘18, M.Arch ‘24), and Wuyahuang Li (SMArchS ‘21)

The Lodgers are a set of temporary “living” structures to enable symbiotic relationships between the land, humans, and other living things. They are shelters for all inhabitants and temporary guests themselves on the land. They will come, go, or decay, returning to the land as the seasons change.

The exhibition showcases the two-year research on Fly Ranch and reflection on the process of coping with friction. It opens on March 31, followed by a mapping workshop in the second week of April and a closing reception on April 29.

On Display:
March 31–April 29, 2022 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery, open 9:00am–9:00pm daily

The Lodgers exhibition is supported by the Council of the Arts at MIT (CAMIT) and MIT Architecture Department. Special thanks to the Burning Man Project and Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI)

DESIGN:INCLUSIVE

An exhibition of work by Ziyuan Zhu and Sheng-Hung Lee

In DESIGN: INCLUSIVE, designers Sheng-Hung Lee and Ziyuan Zhu share how inclusiveness shapes design humanely and environmentally in the creative process. In this exhibition, they explore two topics: Humanity: Inclusive Footwear for an Aging Population and Design for Environmental(ity): Speculative Circularity.

Life and behavior in this fast-paced society have been rapidly transformed by emerging technology, the political environment, advancing healthcare, social justice issues, climate change, and much more. In the midst of these large, complex, and systemic challenges, DESIGN: INCLUSIVE invites reflection, asking: Whose voice is (and continues to be) missing? Who in our society has been deemed vulnerable or less powerful? Which groups of people are confronting the largest degree of exclusion?

On Display:
February 9–March 12, 2022 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery

ppppress

An exhibition of prints curated by ppppress, a student and alumni-run publishing project within the Art, Culture, and Technology Program at MIT (ACT). ppppress was founded by Chucho Ocampo Aguilar, Emma Yimeng Zhu 朱艺蒙, Aarti Sunder, and Po-Hao Chi.

In an effort to bring printed-media back into the ever-growing presence of the virtual and the screen, ppppress presents a collection of prints created using a risograph, perfect binding machine, guillotine, silkscreen, press, and a digital duplicator (a mimeograph married to a xerox machine with a scanning bed on top).

Dancing between the digital and the analog, high tech and craft, and silkscreen and photocopy, the exhibition features content from the MIT Center for Visual Studies (CAVS) archive and work submitted by scholars, designers, artists, and scientists at the Institute.

In addition to the exhibition of prints in the Weisner Gallery, workshops in book making, printing, and storytelling using the CAVS archives are offered to the MIT community throughout January 2022.

On Display:
December 6, 2021–January 21, 2022 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery

The PPPPRESS exhibition is supported by the MIT Architecture Department; Art, Culture, and Technology Program (ACT); CAVS Special Archive, Council of the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), and the MIT Transmedia Storytelling Initiative (TSI).

Special thanks to Thera Webb and Graham Yeager.

Unbounded: Transmedia Storytelling @ MIT, 2019-2021

An exhibition of virtual productions by students across MIT engaged with the Transmedia Storytelling Initiative from 2019-21

Celebrating two years of operation (one and a half of them in a global pandemic), the Transmedia Storytelling Initiative (TSI) of the School of Architecture and Planning (SA+P) presents an exhibition of student work; beginning with the cellphone video made in the first subject taught with TSI curriculum development funds to the latest AR production that engages the dramatic street demonstrations during the Black Lives Matter protests, bringing these events “home” during the pandemic. Spatialized storytelling brings SA+P’s research into architecture and urbanism together with the expanding technologies of virtual production while TSI students push the boundaries of these tools into new directions and urgent current events.

On Display:
October 18–November 23, 2021 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery
Virtual exhibition ongoing

superposeA connected experience of sound and space

Karsten Schuhl, MIT Media Lab, Opera of the Future Group, Graduation 2021

superpose is a water-based multi-sensory interactive installation. It offers a glimpse into how sound and music operate as physical phenomena in space and how humans perceive them. The experience is in constant aural and visual flux, influenced by the presence of the people in its surroundings: an audible and visible choreography of perturbations. Mechanically created circular waves are the audience’s “agents” in the experience, propagating through the water, mixing and interfering with one another. The installation allows the audience to explore sound and its relationship to space by interacting with a metaphor of sound waves through the water. 

On Display:
September 7–October 6, 2021 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery

The superpose project was supported in part by a grant from the Council for the Arts at MIT.

Image: superpose waves, Dyed water, polypropylene, 3D printed mechanisms, painted MDF, aluminum extrusion frame, sound, custom electronics & software, 102 x 55 x 36 inches.
Installation at west lobby at MIT Media Lab, Cambridge, MA, 2021. Photo: Karsten Schuhl.

Learning from reality: artistic exploration and forming understanding

Wednesday, September 29 at 5:00 EST / Virtual Event

A conversation about the relationship contemporary “media art” has with both the idea and reality of technology. How can artistic work include as well as continuously exclude experience, perception, and connection?
 
Featuring Karsten Schuhl, MIT Media Lab ’21 and Wiesner Gallery exhibiting artist; Verena Bachl, artist and founder of Studio Verena Bachl; and Benjamin Maus, who operates allesblinkt: a bureau for art and invention in Berlin, Germany.

The 2021 Harold and Arlene Schnitzer Prize in the Visual Arts

Featuring work by the 2021 award recipients: Po-Hao Chi, ACT; Chucho Ocampo, ACT: Carolyn Tam, Architecture; and Nina Lutz, Media Lab

Each year, the Harold and Arlene Schnitzer Prize recognizes excellent student work in the visual arts at MIT. Portfolios span almost every imaginable medium and theme; many, if not most student artists bridge diverse disciplines and departments, drawing on MIT’s broad knowledge base and its culture of collaboration.

On Display:
Virtual exhibition ongoing

Trapped

Work by Elaheh Ahmadi ‘20, MEng ‘21

Elaheh Ahmadi is a visual and performance artist and computer engineer from Tehran, Iran, currently based in Boston. She utilizes photography, performance, and writing to raise awareness of contemporary social issues, particularly problems of women’s rights, voices and identities around the world. She is currently studying in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, while independently developing her artistic practice and finding her creative voice.

In 2020, Ahmadi received a Bachelor of Science from MIT in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science with a concentration in Photography and Visual Arts. Her research area is mainly focused on robotics and autonomous vehicles. Ahmadi’s mission is to provide a space in which everyone, especially women, feel comfortable expressing different dimensions of their personality.

Botanical Ghosts

Work by Nancy Valladares, MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology ’20 

Botanical Ghosts traces the transatlantic voyage of the ackee tree (Blighia Sapida), and its encounter with British botanist Dorothy Popenoe in Honduras. This project stages a fictional exchange between Dorothy, the ackee fruit and the artist, as they pull on a thread that unravels the history of Lancetilla Botanical Experimental Station. This website collects a film, fictions, letters, photographs, and documents into a speculative archive that reanimates the specters behind Lancetilla and the worlds that emerged from this site. Please note, the exhibition remains open virtually.

The Loss of Green: Imaging Vegetal Worlds

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

A cross-disciplinary conversation where botanical exchanges, medicinal practices and culinary history intersect to unearth the legacies of our ecological present.

Featuring Nancy Valladares, ACT ‘20 and Wiesner Exhibiting Artist; Shireen Hamza, PHD student in History of Science at Harvard and a filmmaker; and Semine Long Callesen, MIT HTC ‘20 and part of the MIT Transmedia Storytelling Initiative.

Misalignments

Work by Dalma Földesi, M.Arch 2020 and Jung In Seo, M.Arch 2020

Misalignments resists the urge to optimize, orthogonalize, mathematize, and discipline matter. Instead, the hybrid ceramic fabrication processes explored in the galleries apply precision to the design of tools and actions. The artifacts emerge from this new approach to shaping clay. Here, the material is the performer; its qualities result from a balancing act between geometric specification and physical behavior. Controlled moments of instability play from an open score that allows different manifestations. Hands and machines equally involved, this process reintroduces authorship and foregrounds labor in an increasingly automated process. It is a risky endeavor. Please note, the exhibition remains open virtually.

2020 Schnitzer Prize in the Visual Arts Exhibition

May 27–June 30, 2020
Featuring work by the 2020 award recipients: Nicole L’Huillier, Media Lab; Rae Yuping Hsu, ACT; Jonathan Zong, CSAIL; Elaheh Ahmadi ’20, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; and Siranush Babakhanova ’20, Physics

Each year, the Harold and Arlene Schnitzer Prize highlights student work in the visual arts at MIT. Portfolios span almost every imaginable medium and theme; many, if not most student artists bridge diverse disciplines and departments, drawing on MIT’s broad knowledge base and its culture of collaboration. Please note, the exhibition remains open virtually.

BODY TEXT

January 15–February 27, 2020
Featuring work by Jonathan Zong, Ph.D. Computer Science, MIT

BODY TEXT is reading as gazing as reading as writing; is a contest of control; is an imperfect way of rendering people and systems legible to each other.

Additional Past Exhibitions

The Jerome B. Wiesner Student Art Gallery was established as a gift from the MIT Class of 1983 to honor the former president of MIT, Jerome Wiesner, for his support of the arts at the Institute. Since then, the gallery space located on the second floor of the MIT Stratton Student Center has exhibited a wide range of both academic and co-curricular artwork by MIT students.

Apply to Exhibit

All current MIT students, both undergraduate and graduate, are eligible to apply for an exhibition in the MIT Wiesner Student Art Gallery. Applications are accepted annually in the spring for the following academic year.

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MIT Affiliation
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MIT Wiesner Student Art Gallery
Stratton Student Center (W20-209)
MIT Building W20, Second floor
84 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Open 9:00am to 9:00pm daily; Hours for general public may be restricted.

Contact: Sarah Hirzel, Gallery Coordinator, shirzel@mit.edu

Established as a gift from the MIT Class of 1983, the Wiesner Gallery honors the former president of MIT, Jerome Wiesner, for his support of the arts at the Institute. The gallery was fully renovated in fall 2016, thanks in part to the generosity of Harold (’44) and Arlene Schnitzer and the Council for the Arts at MIT, and now also serves as a central meeting space for MIT Student Arts Programming including the START Studio, Creative Arts Competition, Student Arts Advisory Board, and Arts Scholars.

Funded in part by the Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT)

DESIGN:INCLUSIVE

An exhibition of work by Ziyuan Zhu and Sheng-Hung Lee

In DESIGN: INCLUSIVE, designers Sheng-Hung Lee and Ziyuan Zhu share how inclusiveness shapes design humanely and environmentally in the creative process. In this exhibition, they explore two topics: Humanity: Inclusive Footwear for an Aging Population and Design for Environmental(ity): Speculative Circularity.

Life and behavior in this fast-paced society have been rapidly transformed by emerging technology, the political environment, advancing healthcare, social justice issues, climate change, and much more. In the midst of these large, complex, and systemic challenges, DESIGN: INCLUSIVE invites reflection, asking: Whose voice is (and continues to be) missing? Who in our society has been deemed vulnerable or less powerful? Which groups of people are confronting the largest degree of exclusion?

On Display:
February 9 – March 12, 2022 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery

PPPPRESS

An exhibition of prints curated by ppppress, a student and alumni-run publishing project within the Art, Culture, and Technology Program at MIT (ACT).
ppppress was founded by Chucho Ocampo Aguilar, Emma Yimeng Zhu 朱艺蒙, Aarti Sunder, and Po-Hao Chi.

In an effort to bring printed-media back into the ever-growing presence of the virtual and the screen, ppppress presents a collection of prints created using a risograph, perfect binding machine, guillotine, silkscreen, press, and a digital duplicator (a mimeograph married to a xerox machine with a scanning bed on top). 

Dancing between the digital and the analog, high tech and craft, and silkscreen and photocopy, the exhibition features content from the MIT Center for Visual Studies (CAVS) archive and work submitted by scholars, designers, artists, and scientists at the Institute.

In addition to the exhibition of prints in the Weisner Gallery, workshops in book making, printing, and storytelling using the CAVS archives are offered to the MIT community throughout January 2022.


On Display:
December 6, 2021 – January 21, 2022 in the Wiesner Student Art Gallery

The 2021 Harold and Arlene Schnitzer Prize in the Visual Arts

Featuring work by the 2021 award recipients: Po-Hao Chi, ACT; Chucho Ocampo, ACT: Carolyn Tam, Architecture; and Nina Lutz, Media Lab.

Each year, the Harold and Arlene Schnitzer Prize recognizes excellent student work in the visual arts at MIT. Portfolios span almost every imaginable medium and theme; many, if not most student artists bridge diverse disciplines and departments, drawing on MIT’s broad knowledge base and its culture of collaboration.

On Display:
Virtual exhibition ongoing

Trapped

Work by Elaheh Ahmadi ‘20, MEng ‘21 

Elaheh Ahmadi is a visual and performance artist and computer engineer from Tehran, Iran, currently based in Boston. She utilizes photography, performance, and writing to raise awareness of contemporary social issues, particularly problems of women’s rights, voices and identities around the world. She is currently studying in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, while independently developing her artistic practice and finding her creative voice.

In 2020, Ahmadi received a Bachelor of Science from MIT in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science with a concentration in Photography and Visual Arts. Her research area is mainly focused on robotics and autonomous vehicles. 

Ahmadi’s mission is to provide a space in which everyone, especially women, feel comfortable expressing different dimensions of their personality.